When do the days of wisdom come?

A scratch! But ask for me tomorrow and you shall find me a grave man.

oldsmokeys:

Maynard Dixon, “A Desert Valley: Panamint, California”, 1922.

oldsmokeys:

Maynard Dixon, “A Desert Valley: Panamint, California”, 1922.

superbnature:

141346 by hydra2007 http://flic.kr/p/n34hz1
smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Stormy Texas Panhandle
Photography by Mike Olbinski (Chandler, Arizona); Friona, Texas

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Stormy Texas Panhandle

Photography by Mike Olbinski (Chandler, Arizona); Friona, Texas

theatlantic:

Prescribing Anxieties for Anxiety

“Some of the things I’m about to say might not make sense,” began O.M., a 22-year-old cancer survivor. He had the far-off look in his eyes that I recognized from so many of the other study participants. They sound like travelers, struggling to describe exotic foreign lands to the people left back home. That struggle is a sign that the treatment has worked. Ineffability is one of the primary criteria that define a mystical experience.
“I was outside of my body, looking at myself,” O.M. continued, “My body was lying on a stretcher in front of a hospital. I felt an incredible anxiety—the same anxiety I had felt every day since my diagnosis. Then, like a switch went on, I went from being anxious to analyzing my anxiety from the outside. I realized that nothing was actually happening to me objectively. It was real because I let it become real. And, right when I had that thought, I saw a cloud of black smoke come out of my body and float away.”
The encounter with the black smoke was just one of many experiences that O.M. had that day. As his mind, “like a rocket,” traversed vast expanses, his body never left the comfortable and well-worn couch at the Bluestone Center for Clinical Research in Midtown Manhattan. The athletic first-year medical student is one of 32 participants in a New York University study examining the hallucinogen psilocybin as a treatment for cancer-related anxiety.
Read more. [Image: NYU]

theatlantic:

Prescribing Anxieties for Anxiety

“Some of the things I’m about to say might not make sense,” began O.M., a 22-year-old cancer survivor. He had the far-off look in his eyes that I recognized from so many of the other study participants. They sound like travelers, struggling to describe exotic foreign lands to the people left back home. That struggle is a sign that the treatment has worked. Ineffability is one of the primary criteria that define a mystical experience.

“I was outside of my body, looking at myself,” O.M. continued, “My body was lying on a stretcher in front of a hospital. I felt an incredible anxiety—the same anxiety I had felt every day since my diagnosis. Then, like a switch went on, I went from being anxious to analyzing my anxiety from the outside. I realized that nothing was actually happening to me objectively. It was real because I let it become real. And, right when I had that thought, I saw a cloud of black smoke come out of my body and float away.”

The encounter with the black smoke was just one of many experiences that O.M. had that day. As his mind, “like a rocket,” traversed vast expanses, his body never left the comfortable and well-worn couch at the Bluestone Center for Clinical Research in Midtown Manhattan. The athletic first-year medical student is one of 32 participants in a New York University study examining the hallucinogen psilocybin as a treatment for cancer-related anxiety.

Read more. [Image: NYU]

abject-reptile:

Willy Fritsch (by Truus, Bob & Jan too!)
pourmecoffee:

Waterton Lake Eclipse

ancientart:

The Persians adopted the Lydian tradition of minting coins following their conquer of Lydia in 547 BCE.

The daric was a golden coin used in the Persian Empire, which is thought to have been named after Persian king Darius I (521-486 BCE). The production of these coins continued after the death of Darius, up until Alexander the Great’s conquest of Persia during the 4th century BCE. Proceeding this conquest we see the use of the double daric, an innovation of Alexander. 

The shown example above is of the obverse and reverse of a double daric of Artaxerxes II, Babylonia, ca. 330–300 BCE. Photo courtesy of & currently located at the Cabinet des Médailles, France. Photo taken by Marie-Lan Nguyen via the Wiki Commons.

nprfreshair:

Supercell thunderstorm photo by Ryan Shepard 

nprfreshair:

Supercell thunderstorm photo by Ryan Shepard 

Bad books on writing tell you to ‘WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW’, a solemn and totally false adage that is the reason there exist so many mediocre novels about English professors contemplating adultery.
Joe Haldeman (via maxkirin)